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    Only Natural Dyes

    Only Natural Dyes

    We are very proud that all of our yarns are naturally dyed. Why is this important? Industrial dyeing is one of the top polluters in the world, consuming tremendous amounts of energy, water and petrochemical based colorants. In using only natural dyes we use less water, the dye materials are biodegradable and the best part is our color pallet is derived from plants and natural sources. A win for you and our planet!

    From the blog

    • August 20, 2017 The Naturally Dyed Colors of SilverSpun® Silk
      The Naturally Dyed Colors of SilverSpun® Silk

      Our new yarn, SilverSpun® Silk, is a glorious blend of American grown Combed Cotton, Tussah Silk and Silver.  Each skein is hand dyed using the best natural dyes available.  We are very proud that we are using only natural dyes for this yarn and thought it might be helpful to share what botanical dye(s) we used to create the beautiful colors of the SilverSpun® Silk color pallet. 

      Today we take a look at, "Sea Grass".  The beautifully subtle color combination of green and yellow for this yarn was created using Indigo & Weld. 

      Indigo - Species of Indigofera were cultivated in Peru, India, East Asia and Egypt in antiquity. The earliest direct evidence for the use of indigo dates to around 4000 BCE and comes from Huaca Prieta, in contemporary Peru. Indigo was actually a plant that got its name because it came from the Indus Valley, discovered some 5,000 years ago, where it was called nila, meaning dark blue. And by the 7th Century BC, people starting using the plant as a dye — Mesopotamians were even carving out recipes for making indigo dye onto clay tablets for record-keeping. By 1289, knowledge of the dye made its way to Europe, when the Venetian merchant traveler Marco Polo reported on it.

      Weld Extract – Weld (Reseda luteola) is the most light fast of the yellow dyes, used by ancient tapestry weavers in Central Asia, Turkey and Europe. Weld is the brightest and clearest yellow flower dye and in combination with iron creates a rich chartreuse, or overdyed with indigo is a clear lime green.

      You can find this color, as well as all the other beautiful naturally dyed colors of SilverSpun® Silk here.

    • August 13, 2017 The Naturally Dyed Colors of SilverSpun® Silk
      The Naturally Dyed Colors of SilverSpun® Silk

      Our new yarn, SilverSpun® Silk, is a glorious blend of American grown Combed Cotton, Tussah Silk and Silver.  Each skein is hand dyed using the best natural dyes available.  We are very proud that we are using only natural dyes for this yarn and thought it might be helpful to share what botanical dye(s) we used to create the beautiful colors of the SilverSpun® Silk color pallet. 

      Today we take a look at, "Cloud Burst".  The variegated soft grays (with just a hint of purple) of this yarn were made using Logwood and Iron.

      Logwood Extract – Logwood (Haematoxylum campechianum) originates from the Yucatan region of Mexico and is naturalized throughout Central America and parts of the Caribbean. It was also known as Palo de Campeche or Campeche wood. Like cochineal, it was one of the valuable dyes from the New World and Spain and England went to war over regions that were lush with logwood trees in an effort to control the lucrative logwood dye trade.

      Logwood yields a rich, deep purple which was used as a base or “bottom” for the desirable dark purple and black colors of European fashion and aristocracy.  It was in such high demand that in the 18th century, nearly all black dyed cloth was colored from Logwood. Today it is used as a traditional textile dye, a laboratory stain and for dyeing sutures. Logwood by itself is not particularly lightfast, so keep from bright sunlight. With added iron, its lightfastness increases and the color darkens to a near black.

      Ferrous Sulfate – Ferrous sulfate (iron) is used as a color changer, darkening or “saddening” natural dyes on protein or cellulose fibers and also increases lightfastness for dyes that are prone to fading. Many of the famous black dye recipes from the 17th and 18th century use generous amounts of iron and tannin to produce rich black and gray colors.

      You can find this color, as well as all the other beautiful naturally dyed colors of SilverSpun® Silk here.

    • August 06, 2017 The Naturally Dyed Colors of SilverSpun® Silk
      The Naturally Dyed Colors of SilverSpun® Silk

      Our new yarn, SilverSpun® Silk, is a glorious blend of American grown Combed Cotton, Tussah Silk and Silver.  Each skein is hand dyed using the best natural dyes available.  We are very proud that we are using only natural dyes for this yarn and thought it might be helpful to share what botanical dye(s) we used to create the beautiful colors of the SilverSpun® Silk color pallet. 

      Today we take a look at, "Indigo".  The beautifully intense blue color of this yarn was made using Indigo.

      Indigo - Species of Indigofera were cultivated in Peru, India, East Asia and Egypt in antiquity. The earliest direct evidence for the use of indigo dates to around 4000 BCE and comes from Huaca Prieta, in contemporary Peru. Indigo was actually a plant that got its name because it came from the Indus Valley, discovered some 5,000 years ago, where it was called nila, meaning dark blue. And by the 7th Century BC, people starting using the plant as a dye — Mesopotamians were even carving out recipes for making indigo dye onto clay tablets for record-keeping. By 1289, knowledge of the dye made its way to Europe, when the Venetian merchant traveler Marco Polo reported on it.

      You can find this color, as well as all the other beautiful naturally dyed colors of SilverSpun® Silk here.